▹ New To Homeschooling?
​▹ ​Feeling Struggling, Frustrated Or Overwhelmed?
​▹ Interested in Unschooling?

Interested in Unschooling
▪

 You've Come To The Right Place For Help!​

You've Come To The Right Place For Help!​
Feeling Frustrated Or Overwhelmed?

​Hi!  I'm Becky.

I was sick and tired of battling my children over their schoolwork.

I now help new or struggling homeschoolers become successful homeschoolers. Let's become successful homeschoolers. Let's bring peace to your homeschool and improve relationships with your children in the process by learning to work with, rather than against, human nature and understand how and why children learn.

I also help homeschoolers who are interested in unschooling by providing information, resources, support, and encouragement.

Let's Get Started!  Are you a new homeschooler, a struggling homeschooler, or one who is interested in unschooling? Make your choice below for customized advice and help.

"I was sick and tired of battling my children over their schoolwork.

Hi!  I'm Becky.

I help new or struggling homeschoolers become successful homeschoolers. Let's bring peace to your homeschool and improve relationships with your children in the process by learning to work with, rather than against, human nature and understand how and why children learn.

I also help homeschoolers who are interested in unschooling by providing information, resources, support, and encouragement.

Let's Get Started!  Are you a new homeschooler, a struggling homeschooler, or one who is interested in unschooling? Make your choice below for customized advice and help.

​Where are you in your homeschooling journey ?

star-o

I'm A
New Homeschooler!

​Let's get you started on the right path with my free, short e-course called "7 Steps to Becoming a Confident, Successful Homeschooler".

Let's get you started on the right path with my free, short e-course called "7 Steps to Becoming a Confident, Successful Homeschooler".
frown-o

​I'm A Struggling Homeschooler!

I'm A Struggling Homeschooler!

​Let's help get you restarted, back on the right path with my free mini-report called "​9 Steps to Rescue a Floundering Homeschool".

Let's help get you restarted, back on the right path with my free mini-report called "X Steps to Rescue a Floundering Homeschool".
Let's get you started on the right path with my free, short e-course called "7 Steps to Becoming a Confident, Successful Homeschooler".
heart-o

​I'm Interested In
Unschooling!

I'm Interested In Unschooling!

Let's get you started on the right path with my free guide called "5 Things You Must Do If You Want to be a Successful Unschooler".

Let's get you started investigating unschooling with my free resource guide that's full of my favorite blogs, posts, groups, and other pickings.
Let's get you started on the right path with my free, short e-course called "7 Steps to Becoming a Confident, Successful Homeschooler".

I was sick and tired of battling my children over their schoolwork.

If successfully homeschooling my kids meant ruining my relationships with them, then homeschooling wasn't going to work for my family.

What if there was a better way to homeschool?

I was sick and tired of battling my children over their schoolwork.

If successfully homeschooling my kids meant ruining my relationships with them, then homeschooling wasn't going to work for my family.

What if you never had to fight with your kids about schoolwork again?

What if there was a way to work with, rather than against, human nature as your children learn the knowledge and acquire the skills they will need in order to be competent, contributing, successful adult members of society?

What if there was a way to break free of the suffocating, one-size-fits-all approach to education?


When there is no peace in your homeschool...when you're fighting with your kids all the time about their schoolwork, what you're actually facing is probably a failing educational philosophy that needs to be reevaluated and changed.

The wrong person's agenda is driving your children's course of study, and your children are protesting (sometimes loudly).

Your children aren't ready for the information you want them to learn.  Either they're not quite developmentally there yet, or they haven't recognized a personally meaningful reason to learn the material.  By insisting that they learn something they aren't ready for or willing to learn, you've run roughshod over the natural order of learning.

The natural order of learning starts with a personally compelling "why" and moves from there to "what", "when", "where", and "how".  The natural order of learning guarantees active, engaged learners you won't have to fight with.  It assures that your children will internalize the information they're seeking, instead of warehousing it in short-term memory long enough to pass the test and get you off their backs.


​The natural order of learning is how infants, toddlers, and preschoolers interact with and make sense of the world around them.  Without a teacher directing them, without a curriculum or a fancy program, without a prescribed sequence of study, all of our little people (with the caveat that they are healthy enough and developing normally) somehow manage to master a staggering array of knowledge and skills.  Each at his or her own pace.

The natural order of learning is how we learn as adults, too.  For reasons that baffle me, we as a society have decided that once children reach the arbitrarily chosen age of five, they are no longer capable of or permitted to continue their own self-directed learning.

Self-directed learning that worked remarkably well for the first five years of their lives.

Self-directed learning that worked remarkably well for humankind before the big push for government sponsored mass education.

Self-directed learning that works remarkably well for competent, contributing adult members of society for the rest of their lives upon release from authority-directed, compulsory education.

The natural order of learning is how infants, toddlers, and preschoolers interact with and make sense of the world around them.  Without a teacher directing them, without a curriculum or a fancy program, without a prescribed sequence of study, all of our little people (with the caveat that they are healthy enough and developing normally) somehow manage to master a staggering array of knowledge and skills.  Each at his or her own pace.

The natural order of learning is how we learn as adults, too.  For reasons that baffle me, we as a society have decided that once children reach the arbitrarily chosen age of five, they are no longer capable of or permitted to continue their own self-directed learning.

Self-directed learning that worked remarkably well for the first five years of their lives.

Self-directed learning that worked remarkably well for humankind before the big push for government sponsored mass education.

Self-directed learning that works remarkably well for competent, contributing adult members of society for the rest of their lives upon release from authority-directed, compulsory education.

Compulsory, authority-directed education tells children what they're interested in isn't important.  It conditions parents and society at large to accept as normal doing to children what we ourselves would find intolerable.  It also sets up an adversarial position between those who think they know best what children should learn and the children themselves.

It doesn't matter whether that compulsory, authority-directed education happens inside a classroom or at a family's kitchen table.  The results are the same.  The measures to which people, who are unwilling to question schoolish beliefs about education, will take in order to justify treating children as we must when we view education through that lens are astonishing.

The majority of my readers fall into one of three camps: you're brand new to homeschooling and trying to get the best start you can, something isn't working well in your homeschool right now, or you're intrigued by the idea of unschooling.  Either way, the best thing you can do is start questioning your schoolish beliefs about education.

You can end the homework battle with your kids (or avoid it all together if you're new to homeschooling) with one simple shift in perspective and four easy steps. Click here to claim your free guide.


Compulsory, authority-directed education tells children what they're interested in isn't important.  It conditions parents and society at large to accept as normal doing to children what we ourselves would find intolerable.  It also sets up an adversarial position between those who think they know best what children should learn and the children themselves.

It doesn't matter whether that compulsory, authority-directed education happens inside a classroom or at a family's kitchen table.  The results are the same.  The measures to which people, who are unwilling to question schoolish beliefs about education, will take in order to justify treating children as we must when we view education through that lens are astonishing.

The majority of my readers fall into one of three camps: you're brand new to homeschooling and trying to get the best start you can, something isn't working well in your homeschool right now, or you're intrigued by the idea of unschooling.  Either way, the best thing you can do is start questioning your schoolish beliefs about education.

You can end the homework battle with your kids (or avoid it all together if you're new to homeschooling) with one simple shift in perspective and four easy steps. Click here to claim your free guide: 4 Steps to Ending the Homework Battle.

4 Steps to Ending the Homework Battle
When there is no peace in your homeschool...when you're fighting with your kids all the time about their schoolwork, what you're actually facing is probably a failing educational philosophy that needs to be reevaluated and changed.

The wrong person's agenda is driving your children's course of study, and your children are protesting (sometimes loudly).

Your children aren't ready for the information you want them to learn.  Either they're not quite developmentally there yet, or they haven't recognized a personally meaningful reason to learn the material.  By insisting that they learn something they aren't ready for or willing to learn, you've run roughshod over the natural order of learning.

The natural order of learning starts with a personally compelling "why" and moves from there to "what", "when", "where", and "how".  The natural order of learning guarantees active, engaged learners you won't have to fight with.  It assures that your children will internalize the information they're seeking, instead of warehousing it in short-term memory long enough to pass the test and get you off their backs.

The natural order of learning is how infants, toddlers, and preschoolers interact with and make sense of the world around them.  Without a teacher directing them, without a curriculum or a fancy program, without a prescribed sequence of study, all of our little people (with the caveat that they are healthy enough and developing normally) somehow manage to master a staggering array of knowledge and skills.  Each at his or her own pace.

The natural order of learning is how we learn as adults, too.  For reasons that baffle me, we as a society have decided that once children reach the arbitrarily chosen age of five, they are no longer capable of or permitted to continue their own self-directed learning.

Self-directed learning that worked remarkably well for the first five years of their lives.

Self-directed learning that worked remarkably well for humankind before the big push for government sponsored mass education.

Self-directed learning that works remarkably well for competent, contributing adult members of society for the rest of their lives upon release from authority-directed, compulsory education.

Compulsory, authority-directed education tells children what they're interested in isn't important.  It conditions parents and society at large to accept as normal doing to children what we ourselves would find intolerable.  It also sets up an adversarial position between those who think they know best what children should learn and the children themselves.

It doesn't matter whether that compulsory, authority-directed education happens inside a classroom or at a family's kitchen table.  The results are the same.  The measures to which people, who are unwilling to question schoolish beliefs about education, will take in order to justify treating children as we must when we view education through that lens are astonishing.

The majority of my readers fall into one of three camps: you're brand new to homeschooling and trying to get the best start you can, something isn't working well in your homeschool right now, or you're intrigued by the idea of unschooling.  Either way, the best thing you can do is start questioning your schoolish beliefs about education.

You can end the homework battle with your kids (or avoid it all together if you're new to homeschooling) with one simple shift in perspective and four easy steps. Click here to claim your free guide.

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​Testimonials

Hello Becky,

I have finally found your blog and it is exactly what I need right now. Your writing is wonderful and you have finally showed me where I kind of sit on the homeschooling / unschooling spectrum..... So thank you so much.

Like you, I also have three children ages 13, 9 and 7 with my oldest being my son and my youngest two being my daughters. We have been homeschooling for around 5 years or so now.... starting off back in Australia where we used to live, to over here in USA where we have now lived for only 7 months so far.

I feel like I am on a kind of threshold between homeschooling and unschooling and feel that finding your way of describing it all - as a self directed homeschooling family - resonates so well with me. So I look forward to reading more and more of your blog and hearing what you have to say and seeing what you guys are up to and so on.

Annette Long